Editorial Policies

Focus and Scope

The American Medical Student Research Journal was created by medical students to give future physician-scientists the opportunity to develop the critical thinking skills needed to succeed in academia and clinical practice. Our journal is authored, reviewed, and edited by medical students working under the guidance of faculty mentors. We believe that enhancing exposure to academic research through the development of analytic appraisal skills in the peer review process will enrich the conventional medical curriculum. Furthermore, we are dedicated to promoting interest in future career research through recognizing the scientific accomplishments of medical students across the country. We are seeking notable articles, of which a medical student is the primary author, which meet excellence in research standards.

 

Section Policies

Basic Science Research

Basic Science articles include original research in areas not directly involving clinical insight/outcomes, nor are they considered clinical trials by the ICMJE. Fields involving these articles include but are not limited to: Biochemistry, Virology, Physiology, Pharmacology, Neuroscience, etc. Translational research falls under this category as long as investigations are not aimed at determining direct clinical outcomes. Articles may not exceed 4000 words.

In addition to following the guidelines for all articles, Basic Science articles should include in the title page a section detailing the specific field of research (i.e. Virology). Structured abstracts are required.

Basic Science manuscripts should be structured in the following manner:


I. Title Page

  • Article title. The title provides a distilled description of the complete article and should include information that, along with the abstract, will make electronic retrieval of the article sensitive and specific. Ensure all reporting requirements for your type of research are met for each title as detailed in the specifics for various types research articles.
  • Author names. Author names should be listed underneath the article title with the highest degree earned, followed by a superscript that corresponds with the author information.
  • Author information: Author's institutional affiliation and highest degree earned should be listed.
  • Corresponding author contact information. Corresponding author name, institutional email, phone number, and fax number should be listed.
  • IRB approval. All submitted articles must include a statement addressing Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval. This statement must clearly disclose that IRB approval was obtained for the submitted research, approval was waived for the study by the IRB, or that approval was not necessary for the research in question.
  • Field of research (Basic Science Section only). Articles submitted to Basic Science must include a statement which describes the field research was conducted in; i.e., Virology.
  • Statement of source(s) of support. These include grants, equipment, drugs, and/or other support that facilitated conduct of the work described in the article or the writing of the article itself. If no support was provided, state: "No material support was provided for this article."
  • Conflict of Interest declaration. Please disclose conflict of interests in this section according to the ICMJE disclosure rules found here."  If none, state: "The authors do not have conflicts of interest to disclose."
  • Word count. Please include a word count for the article excluding its abstract, acknowledgments, tables, figure legends, and references. In addition, please include a second word count without any exclusions.
  • Number of figures and tables. Please include the total numbers of figures and tables.
  • Keywords. Please indicate 3 words that best represent the article, which readers can use to search for the published article.

II. Structured Abstract

The abstracts are limited to 500 words and should provide the context or background for the study and should include the following:

  • Objective(s)
  • Materials and Method (type of study, settings, measurements, analytical methods)
  • Results (giving specific effect sizes and their statistical and clinical significance, if possible)
  • Conclusions
  • Relevance (should emphasize new and important aspects of the study or observations)

III. Introduction

Provide a context or background for the study (that is, the nature of the problem and its significance). State the specific purpose or research objective of, or hypothesis tested by, the study or observation. Cite only directly pertinent references, and do not include data or conclusions from the work being reported.

IV. Materials and Methods

Clearly describe how and why a study was done in a particular way. Identify methods, equipment (give the manufacturer's name and city, state of corporate address in parentheses), and procedures in sufficient detail to allow others to reproduce the results. Give references to established methods and provide references and brief descriptions for methods that have been published but are not well-known. Describe new or substantially modified methods, give the reasons for using them.

Identify all drugs and chemicals used, including generic name(s), dose(s), and route(s) of administration. Identify appropriate scientific names and gene names.

The section should include only information that was available at the time the plan or protocol for the study was being written; all information obtained during the study belongs in the Results section.

V. Results

Present your results in logical sequence in the text, tables, and figures. If data is displayed in tables or figures, do not repeat it in the text.

Give numeric results not only as derivatives (for example, percentages) but also as the absolute numbers from which the derivatives were calculated (e.g., 14% (19/133), and specify the statistical significance attached to them, if any. Restrict tables and figures to those needed to explain the argument of the paper and to assess supporting data. Use graphs as an alternative to tables with many entries; do not duplicate data in graphs and tables. Avoid nontechnical uses of technical terms in statistics, such as "random" (which implies a randomizing device), "normal," "significant," "correlations," and "sample."

Separate reporting of data by demographic variables, such as age and sex, facilitate pooling of data for subgroups across studies and should be routine, unless there are compelling reasons not to stratify reporting, which should be explained.

VI. Discussion

Emphasize the new and important aspects of the study and the conclusions that follow from them in the context of the totality of the best available evidence. Do not repeat in detail data or other information given in other parts of the manuscript, such as in the Introduction or the Results section. For experimental studies, it is useful to begin the discussion by briefly summarizing the main findings, then explore possible mechanisms or explanations for these findings, compare and contrast the results with other relevant studies, state the limitations of the study, and explore the implications of the findings for future research and for clinical practice.

Link the conclusions with the goals of the study, but avoid unqualified statements and conclusions not adequately supported by the data. In particular, distinguish between clinical and statistical significance, and avoid making statements on economic benefits and costs unless the manuscript includes the appropriate economic data and analyses. Avoid claiming priority or alluding to work that has not been completed. State new hypotheses when warranted, but label them clearly.

VII. References

Follow the journal style guidelines in accordance with the American Medical Association's Manual of Style, 10th edition.

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Clinical Research

The Clinical Research Section includes reports on clinical trials, systematic reviews, retrospective chart reviews, meta-analyses, and translational research directed at determining clinical outcomes. Articles may not exceed 4000 words.

In addition to following the guidelines for all research articles, articles submitted to this section must include a structured abstract.

Clinical Trials

  • The International Committee on Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) defines a clinical trial as any research project that prospectively assigns human participants to intervention or comparison groups to study the cause-and-effect relationship between an intervention and a health outcome. Interventions include but are not limited to drugs, surgical procedures, devices, behavioral treatments, etc.
  • The International Committee on Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) defines a clinical trial as any research project that prospectively assigns human participants to intervention or comparison groups to study the cause-and-effect relationship between an intervention and a health outcome. Interventions include but are not limited to drugs, surgical procedures, devices, behavioral treatments, etc.
  • Submitted articles concerning clinical trials must be accompanied by a copy of the trial protocol, statistical analysis plan, and a CONSORT Flow Diagram and Checklist: http://www.consort-statement.org/consort-statement/
  • It is required that all submitted research concerning clinical trials must be registered via an online public registry listed per the ICMJE. All clinical trials and secondary analysis of existing clinical trials must be registered before a manuscript is submitted for publication.
  • Trial registry name, registration identification number, and the URL for the registry should be included on the title page.
  • Acceptable trial registries include http://www.clinicaltrials.gov and others listed at http://www.icmje.org.

Systematic Reviews

  • Systematic reviews are articles that are structured around investigation of a specific question or issue.
  • This question or issue should be one that is clinically relevant and the investigation should be done in an evidence-based manner.
  • Structured abstracts are required.
  • Review articles should clearly state the question or issue of interest and address relevance
  • Articles should emphasize high-quality research, describe the process used to assess evidence, detailing inclusion and exclusion criteria
  • Articles should include a discussion on the strengths and weakness of included evidence
    • Meta-analysis articles are assessments of compiled published literature and evidence concerning a clinical topic of interest. These topics frequently include analysis of disease therapies, prevention, etiology, or diagnosis.
    • Data sources should be current and represent evidence located within several months of manuscript submission. The submitted manuscript should state the process used for locating and selecting included research and evidence, such as inclusion and exclusion criteria.
    • For each included article or evidence, the type of study should be identified, as well as the target population, intervention, tests, or outcomes, as appropriate. Submission of meta-analyses of clinical trial studies should be accompanied by the PRISMA checklist and flow diagram (http://www.prisma-statement.org/statement.htm).
    • Abstracts are required for meta-analysis articles; please see the section on preparing structured abstracts for more information.
    • The manuscript title should include the phrase "A Meta-analysis."

Meta-analyses

Clinical Research manuscripts should be structured in the following manner: 

I. Title Page

  • Article title. The title provides a distilled description of the complete article and should include information that, along with the abstract, will make electronic retrieval of the article sensitive and specific. Ensure all reporting requirements for your type of research are met for each title as detailed in the specifics for various types research articles.
  • Author names. Author names should be listed underneath the article title with the highest degree earned, followed by a superscript that corresponds with the author information.
  • Author information: Authors' institutional affiliation and highest degree earned should be listed.
  • Corresponding author contact information. Corresponding author name, institutional email, phone number, and fax number should be listed.
  • IRB approval. All submitted articles must include a statement addressing Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval. This statement must clearly disclose that IRB approval was obtained for the submitted research, approval was waived for the study by the IRB, or that approval was not necessary for the research in question.
  • Clinical Trial Registration (Clinical Research Section only). Articles submitted to Clinical Research must include a statement which list the relevant clinical trial registration.
  • Statement of source(s) of support. These include grants, equipment, drugs, and/or other support that facilitated conduct of the work described in the article or the writing of the article itself. If no support was provided, state: "No material support was provided for this article."
  • Conflict of Interest declaration. Please disclose conflict of interests in this section according to the ICMJE disclosure rules found here If none, state: "The authors do not have conflicts of interest to disclose."
  • Word count. Please include a word count for the article excluding its abstract, acknowledgments, tables, figure legends, and references. In addition, please include a second word count without any exclusions.
  • Number of figures and tables. Please include the total numbers of figures and tables.
  • Keywords. Please indicate 3 words that best represent the article, which readers can use to search for the published article.

II. Structured Abstract

The abstract is limited to 500 words and should provide the context or background for the study and should include the following:

  • Study Objective
  • Study Design (type of study, participants, settings, measurements, analytical methods)
  • Results (giving specific effect sizes and their statistical and clinical significance, if possible)
  • Conclusions and Relevance (should emphasize new and important aspects of the study or observations, note important limitations, and not over-interpret findings)

III. Introduction

Provide a context or background for the study (that is, the nature of the problem and its significance). State the specific purpose or research objective of, or hypothesis tested by, the study or observation. Cite only directly pertinent references, and do not include data or conclusions from the work being reported.

IV. Materials and Methods

Clearly describe how and why a study was done in a particular way. Identify methods, equipment (give the manufacturer's name and city, state of corporate address in parentheses), and procedures in sufficient detail to allow others to reproduce the results. Give references to established methods, provide references and brief descriptions for methods that have been published but are not well-known; describe new or substantially modified methods, give the reasons for using them, and evaluate their limitations.

Identify all drugs and chemicals used, including generic name(s), dose(s), and route(s) of administration. Identify appropriate scientific names and gene names.

The section should include only information that was available at the time the plan or protocol for the study was being written; all information obtained during the study belongs in the Results section.

V. Selection and Description of Participants

Clearly describe the selection of observational or experimental participants (healthy individuals or patients, including controls), including eligibility and exclusion criteria and a description of the source population. Because the relevance of such variables as age, sex, or ethnicity is not always known at the time of study design, researchers should aim for inclusion of representative populations into all study types and at a minimum provide descriptive data for these and other relevant demographic variables. If the study was done involving an exclusive population, for example in only one sex, authors should justify why, except in obvious cases (e.g., prostate cancer).

VI. Results

Present your results in logical sequence in the text, tables, and figures. If data is displayed in tables or figures, do not repeat it in the text.

Give numeric results not only as derivatives (for example, percentages) but also as the absolute numbers from which the derivatives were calculated (e.g., 14% (19/133), and specify the statistical significance attached to them, if any. Restrict tables and figures to those needed to explain the argument of the paper and to assess supporting data. Use graphs as an alternative to tables with many entries; do not duplicate data in graphs and tables. Avoid nontechnical uses of technical terms in statistics, such as "random" (which implies a randomizing device), "normal," "significant," "correlations," and "sample."

Separate reporting of data by demographic variables, such as age and sex, facilitate pooling of data for subgroups across studies and should be routine, unless there are compelling reasons not to stratify reporting, which should be explained.

VII. Discussion

Emphasize the new and important aspects of the study and the conclusions that follow from them in the context of the totality of the best available evidence. Do not repeat in detail data or other information given in other parts of the manuscript, such as in the Introduction or the Results section. For experimental studies, it is useful to begin the discussion by briefly summarizing the main findings, then explore possible mechanisms or explanations for these findings, compare and contrast the results with other relevant studies, state the limitations of the study, and explore the implications of the findings for future research and for clinical practice.

Link the conclusions with the goals of the study, but avoid unqualified statements and conclusions not adequately supported by the data. In particular, distinguish between clinical and statistical significance, and avoid making statements on economic benefits and costs unless the manuscript includes the appropriate economic data and analyses. Avoid claiming priority or alluding to work that has not been completed. State new hypotheses when warranted, but label them clearly.

VIII. References

Follow the journal style guidelines in accordance with the American Medical Association's Manual of Style, 10th edition.

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CASE REPORTS

Case Report Section includes articles describing a single patient, articles describing a series of related patients, and articles describing a single/multiple patient/s accompanied by a review of the literature. In addition to following the guidelines for all articles, a non-structured abstract which provides a brief summary of the case is required.

All patients included in the case report, case series, or case and review must give permission for publication. This requires both written and oral informed consent when using any identifiable patient information. Such information includes any information that can identify the patient, even by the patients themselves. This includes, but is not limited to, patient descriptions, descriptions of disease course and accompanying media. A copy of all documentation of informed consent must be submitted. Finally, a signed copy of the Consent Acknowledgement form must accompany all submissions.

Case Reports

  • Present a synopsis of a single patient case along with a discussion centered on the significant aspects of the case.
  • Recommended length is 1000 to 3000 words (not including abstract, tables, figures, references, etc.) with no more than a total of 3 tables and/or figures.

Case Series

  • Present synopses of multiple patients with similar pathology.
  • Recommended length is 2000 to 4000 words (not including abstract, tables, figures, references, etc.) with no more than a total of 3 tables and/or figures.

Case of the week

  • Present shorter case reports with a length limit of 500 words, accompanied by one related quiz question.
  • The question should include 3 to 5 potential answers followed by the answer and an explanation.

Case and Review

  • These studies can fulfill our definition of a case report or case series; and, in addition, they take the form of a more lengthy and complete review of the literature on the given subject.
  • Review articles without discussion of a case or case series will not be accepted.
  • There are no limits on length or media.

Case Report Section manuscripts must be structured in the following manner:

I. Title Page

  • Article title. The title provides a distilled description of the complete article and should include information that, along with the abstract, will make electronic retrieval of the article sensitive and specific. Ensure all reporting requirements for your type of research are met for each title as detailed in the specifics for various types research articles.
  • Author names. Author names should be listed underneath the article title with the highest degree earned, followed by a superscript that corresponds with the author information.
  • Author information: Authors' institutional affiliation and highest degree earned should be listed.
  • Corresponding author contact information. Corresponding author name, institutional email, phone number, and fax number should be listed.
  • IRB approval. All submitted articles must include a statement addressing Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval. This statement must clearly disclose that IRB approval was obtained for the submitted research, approval was waived for the study by the IRB, or that approval was not necessary for the research in question.
  • Statement of source(s) of support. These include grants, equipment, drugs, and/or other support that facilitated conduct of the work described in the article or the writing of the article itself. If no support was provided, state: "No material support was provided for this article."
  • Conflict of Interest declaration. Please disclose conflict of interests in this section according to the ICMJE disclosure rules found here If none, state: "The authors do not have conflicts of interest to disclose."
  • Word count. Please include a word count for the article excluding its abstract, acknowledgments, tables, figure legends, and references. In addition, please include a second word count without any exclusions.
  • Number of figures and tables. Please include the total numbers of figures and tables.
  • Keywords. Please indicate 3 words that best represent the article, which readers can use to search for the published article.

II. Non-structured Abstract

Brief synopsis of the case (s) presented, may not exceed 200 words.

III. Case Presentation

Includes a summary of the history of present illness, past medical and surgical history, allergies, medications, social history, family history, review of systems, physical exam, lab evaluation, imaging, treatment, and outcome.

IV. Discussion

Centered on the significant or unusual aspects of the case.

V. References

Follow the journal style guidelines in accordance with the American Medical Association's Manual of Style, 10th edition.

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HUMANITIES

HUMANITIES

Manuscripts submitted to the Humanities section include those which address the political, social, and personal experiential aspects of medicine. Humanities articles must be submitted with a title page, but do not require abstracts. Occasionally, the editors may submit particular prompts to solicit submissions regarding a specific topic. When this occurs, the time frame for submission along with length requirements will be provided along with other pertinent information.  Articles NOT related to the writing prompt may still be submitted with the understanding that consideration and publication of these articles may be delayed until all topical articles are reviewed.

Viewpoints

Address a topic in medicine (including research, public health policy, ethics, health law) the writer feels to be especially important and worthy of discussion. Position should be stated clearly and papers should be well focused. We ask the author to maintain a professional voice throughout the paper and encourage constructive criticism when appropriate. Maximum length 3000 words with no more than 7 references.

Personal Experience Essays

Address personal experiences in medicine the author feels especially moving or enlightening. Possible topics discussed include, but are certainly NOT limited to; patient-physician relationship, humanism in medicine, and the meaning of professionalism in medicine. Please refrain from using patient names or other specific information that may identify a patient. Maximum length 3000 words.

Letters to the Editor

The AMSRJ encourages dialogue regarding pertinent topics. If you would like to submit a letter to the editor discussing a recently published article, please do so within 4 weeks of publication of the article. Letters to the Editor should be no more than 1000 words and contain no more than 5 references, one of which should be the AMSRJ article. Please maintain a professional voice throughout the letter.

Articles submitted to the Humanities Section should be structured in the following manner:

I. Title Page

  • Article title. The title provides a distilled description of the complete article and should include information that, along with the abstract, will make electronic retrieval of the article sensitive and specific. Ensure all reporting requirements for your type of research are met for each title as detailed in the specifics for various types research articles.
  • Author names. Author names should be listed underneath the article title with the highest degree earned, followed by a superscript that corresponds with the author information.
  • Author information: Authors' institutional affiliation and highest degree earned should be listed.
  • Corresponding author contact information. Corresponding author name, institutional email, phone number, and fax number should be listed.
  • IRB approval. All submitted articles must include a statement addressing Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval. This statement must clearly disclose that IRB approval was obtained for the submitted research, approval was waived for the study by the IRB, or that approval was not necessary for the research in question.
  • Statement of source(s) of support. These include grants, equipment, drugs, and/or other support that facilitated conduct of the work described in the article or the writing of the article itself. If no support was provided, state: "No material support was provided for this article."
  • Conflict of Interest declaration. Please disclose conflict of interests in this section according to the ICMJE disclosure rules found here. If none, state: "The authors do not have conflicts of interest to disclose."
  • Word count. Please include a word count for the article excluding its abstract, acknowledgments, tables, figure legends, and references. In addition, please include a second word count without any exclusions.
  • Number of figures and tables. Please include the total numbers of figures and tables.
  • Keywords. Please indicate 3 words that best represent the article, which readers can use to search for the published article.

II. Body of the Article

Article must adhere to the guidelines described above for Viewpoints, Personal Experience Essays, and Letters to the Editor.

II. References

Follow the journal style guidelines in accordance with the American Medical Association's Manual of Style, 10th edition.

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ARTWORK

We are currently accepting artwork submissions for publication consideration.  All styles and mediums are welcome!  Topics relevant to medicine and healthcare will likely be given priority, but are not necessary to be accepted.

Accepted submissions will be incorporated into the journal in ways such as but not limited to individual page works, section/heading dividers (humanities, case studies, clinical research, etc.), and article supplementation.

Additionally, AMSRJ is accepting for publication New Yorker-style cartoons featuring a topic relevant to medicine or medical students.

Artwork submissions will not undergo peer review, and decisions for inclusion will be made within a week by the Layout Editor and Editor-in-Chief.  All artwork submissions must be accompanied by a signed Author Statement uploaded as a supplementary file.

Additionally, one submission will be selected for representation on the cover page. This submission will be chosen in concurrence of the Layout Editor and Editor-in-Chief to best represent the vision and subject content demonstrated in the current journal edition.

Please direct artwork inquiries to the Layout Editor at kcamp4@lsuhsc.edu

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PERSPECTIVES FOR RESIDENCY

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Peer Review Process

PEER REVIEW WORKFLOW

  1. Article submitted. Editor-in-Chief will do initial evaluation.
  2. Articles deemed entirely non-publishable material will be sent to AMSRJ Faculty Advisory Board Chair with the recommendation to reject outright.
  3. Articles considered possibly publishable will enter the review process with the assignment to a Section Editor. The assigned Section Editor will choose two student reviewers and a faculty advisor.
  4. Student Reviewers have 48 hours to decline to review article, but should decline as soon as possible if they are aware of conflicts in order to expedite re-assignment.
  5. Student reviewers individually assess article and send their review to Section Editor. Student reviewers have 2 weeks to complete their individual review.
  6. Section Editors will review article and associated comments to compile a preliminary peer review summary and letter to the author before arranging the Faculty Advisor review.
  7. Section Editor review and faculty assessment should take place promptly so that the entire initial review will be completed by one month after the submission.
  8. Section Editor incorporates Faculty Advisor comments into the completed review summary and finalizes the letter to the author.
  9. The Section Editor sends these documents to the Editor-in-Chief with the recommendation to conditionally accept pending revisions, accept with no revisions, revise and resubmit, or reject without the option to revise.
  10. Editor-in-Chief notifies the author of the editorial decision, and sends them the Section Editor recommendations if revisions are required.
  11. If the editorial decision is accepted pending required revisions, student author has one month to resubmit. Second review will be completed within four weeks.
  12. If the editorial decision is revise and resubmit, the resubmitted article will re-enter the usual review process with a decision delivered within one month.

REVIEWER DATABASE

 

  1. Reviewer information will be logged in database for Section Editor use.
  2. All declinations will be logged.
  3. Section Editor ratings of reviewers will be logged.
  4. The average number of days to complete a review will be logged.
  5. Only students who have completed at least one review and are considered to be in good standing per the Section Editor ratings will be documented as official journal reviewers and listed in the publication.

 

Example entry:

 

NAME

EMAIL

YEAR

AVE#DAYS

DECLINED

COMPLETED

RATING

Student

st@lsuhsc.edu

MS3

7

1

3

5

 

REVIEWER TRAINING

Reviewers should complete all training modules as directed by the Education Editor.

REVIEWER ETHICS

 

  1. Reviewers are obligated to decline to review an article if they are affiliated with the lab in which the article was produced, personally know the submitting authors, or otherwise have a conflict of interest in providing an objective review of the material. Valid conflict of interest declinations will not be logged in the database.
  2. Reviewers are obligated to guard the privacy of submitted work. Reviewers may only discuss submitted work with the Section Editor, the assigned Faculty Advisor, the Deputy Editor, and the Editor-in-Chief. If the reviewer would like to discuss the material with another professor, a written request must be submitted to and approved by the Deputy Editor prior to disclosure. Discussion of the material with others or disclosure of submitting author name is strictly prohibited.
  3. Reviewers must comport themselves in an appropriate and professional manner in all communications to other students and faculty while representing the journal.

 

REVIEWER RESPONSIBILITIES

 

  1. Abide by Reviewer Ethics policy.
  2. Complete reviewer training.
  3. Register on the website as a reviewer following completion of the mandatory training.
  4. If there is a scheduling conflict, decline articles as soon as possible to expedite re-assignment. Must accept or decline article within 48 hours.
  5. Assess assigned article within two weeks. Compose specific comments consistent with reviewer guidelines.
  6. Maintain prompt communication to Section Editor.
  7. Follow Section Editor instructions on revising comments.
  8. Comply with all journal guidelines and policies.

 

REVIEWER RATINGS

 

  1. Section Editors will rate reviewers after each assignment on a system out of 5.
  2. To secure a rating of 5, reviewers must exhibit prompt and professional communication at all times, review articles in an efficient manner with well-written, thoughtful comments that require little Section Editor and Faculty Advisor revision.
  3. To secure a rating of 4, reviewers must exhibit prompt and professional communication at all times, review articles in an efficient manner with well-written, thoughtful comments.
  4. A rating of 3 will be assigned to reviewers who do not maintain prompt and professional communication or review articles in a timely manner, but do demonstrate sufficient effort in reviewing articles.
  5. A rating of 2 will be assigned to reviewers who do not demonstrate sufficient effort in reviewing articles.
  6. A rating of 1 will be assigned to reviewers who do not demonstrate sufficient effort in reviewing articles and do not review articles in a timely manner.
  7. A rating of 0 will be assigned to reviewers who do not complete the assignment after accepting it.
  8. At the end of each year, reviewer ratings and Section Editor comments will be reviewed by the Editorial Board to determine an annual “Reviewer of the Year” to be honored in a published issue.

REVIEWER DISMISSAL

 

  1. Any violation of Reviewer Ethics policy is grounds for an Editorial Board dismissal vote.
  2. Faculty Advisor complaints and Section Editor complaints are grounds for an Editorial Board dismissal vote.
  3. Two Section Editor ratings of under 3/5 are grounds for an Editorial Board dismissal vote.
  4. A majority vote of the Editorial Board is required for dismissal.
  5. All episodes of dismissal will be reported to the AMSRJ Faculty Advisory Board Chair and may be reported to the institutional Dean of Student Affairs depending on the nature of the misconduct.
  6. Dismissal records will be kept in the reviewer database.

 

 

Open Access Policy

This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

 

Archiving

This journal utilizes the LOCKSS system to create a distributed archiving system among participating libraries and permits those libraries to create permanent archives of the journal for purposes of preservation and restoration. More...

 

Join the Editorial Team

INTERESTED IN BECOMING A REVIEWER?

The peer review process is the foundation of an academic publication. We offer a series of concise education modules for interested students to complete prior to offering review assignments.

Please contact our Education Editor, Beau Vidrine (cvidr3@lsuhsc.edu), to complete the training and register.

 

INTERESTED IN JOINING THE EDITORIAL TEAM?

The Marketing and Fundraising Committees are essential to the success and sustainability of AMSRJ, as well as a pathway to future Editorial Board membership considerations.

We are seeking professional, prompt, and reliable committee members who will:

  1. Maintain timely and efficient communication; response to the corresponding editor's email is expected within 48 hours.
  2. Participate in video-conference meetings, usually held once a month, and sometimes more frequently.
  3. Generate new ideas relevant to their committee and participate in decision-making and implementation of group objectives.

MARKETING COMMITTEE

We're looking for creative, high-energy students who want to join our team and help promote our journal in their area. As an AMSRJ representative, you will be working with a diverse group of people from around the country to come up with great ideas for encouraging submissions and promoting readership.

Send applications to Admin@amsrj.org. Please include:

  • A CV
  • A description of how you would like to "pitch" AMSRJ in your area to other medical students (bonus points for complete sample pitch, as well as innovative outreach/expansion ideas)

FUNDRAISING COMMITTEE

We're looking for business-savvy, champion networkers to join our team and contribute to the sustainability of AMSRJ. As an AMSRJ representative, you will collaborate with your peers to develop and implement giving initiatives to ensure the longevity of the journal. Members will be responsible for recruiting donors and may coordinate annual area fundraisers.

Send applications to Admin@amsrj.org. Please include:

  • A CV
  • A brief statement of why you are suited specifically for this role and your ideas for donor recruitment